Current News Releases

Media Alert: Free Community Health Screenings

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Brancati Center will provide free community health screenings this Saturday, June 24, at Zion Baptist Church/Oliver Community Outreach Fair.

Molecular Test for Common Causes of Vaginitis Receives FDA Approval

Johns Hopkins researchers report that a molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of  vaginal tissue they say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the U.S. each year.

A No-Brainer? Mouse Eyes Constrict to Light Without Direct Link to the Brain

Experimenting with mice, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report new evidence that the eye’s iris in many lower mammals directly senses light and causes the pupil to constrict without involving the brain.

Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss the Science Behind Broccoli and Diabetes

Jed Fahey, assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is available to comment on new research showing that sulforaphane—a compound naturally found in broccoli—could potentially manage blood glucose levels in people with type II diabetes.

Study Finds One in Five Hospitalized Adults Suffer Side Effects From Prescribed Antibiotics

A study examining the impact of antibiotics prescribed for nearly 1500 adult patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital found that adverse side effects occurred in a fifth of them, and that nearly a fifth of those side effects occurred in patients who didn’t need antibiotics in the first place.

Johns Hopkins Medicine Expands Collaboration with Allegheny Health Network and Highmark

Officials at Johns Hopkins Medicine announced today an expansion of its five-year affiliation with Allegheny Health Network (AHN) and Highmark, which provide health care services and insurance to people in Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Delaware. The newly expanded relationship aims to support the care of patients with rare and complex adult and pediatric cancers and some organ-transplant patients, widen the portfolio of cancer clinical trials available to AHN’s patients, facilitate participation in medical education, and collaborate on genomic sequencing and precision medicine research.

Johns Hopkins Health System President and Executive Vice President of Johns Hopkins Medicine Announces Retirement at Year’s End

After more than 44 years of unparalleled service to Johns Hopkins, Ronald R. Peterson has announced plans to retire as president of Johns Hopkins Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine at the end of 2017.

Study Calls For Use of Better Outcome Measures in Clinical Trials for Fragile X Syndrome and Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders

A group of researchers from several institutions in the USA, including Johns Hopkins Medicine, reports that its review of 22 clinical trials of fragile X syndrome (FXS) suggests the need for a wider use of newer and improved treatment outcome measurement tools for this and other several neurodevelopmental disorders. FXS is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the most common form of autism associated with a single gene mutation.

New Research Grants from the Johns Hopkins Bladder Cancer Institute

Increasing our understanding of bladder cancer pathogenesis, using immune surveillance to eradicate local tumors and micrometastases, and attempting to identify molecular subtypes in bladder cancers to support personalized therapies: These are some of the exciting research initiatives being recognized by the Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute 2017 Research Grants Awards.

Study Adds Evidence That Flaws in a Tumor's Genetic Mending Kit Drive Treatment Response to Immunotherapy Drugs

In an expanded, three-year clinical trial of 86 patients with colorectal and 11 other kinds of cancer that have so-called ‘mismatch repair’ genetic defects, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy have found that half of the patients respond to an immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab (Keytruda). In a report on the findings, which led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve expanded use of pembrolizumab for patients, the researchers also say they found evidence that the immune responses closely aligned with mutations found in their cancers. The report is published online in the June 8 issue of the journal Science.

New Class of Double-Duty Magnetic Nanoparticles Engineered to Lower Cancer’s Defenses While Firing up Immune System

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells’ defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice. Experiments with the tiny, double-duty “immunoswitch” found it able to dramatically slow the growth of mouse melanoma and colon cancer and even eradicate tumors in test animals, the researchers report.

Tip Sheet: Immunotherapy Trial Results for Cancer among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

Combining two checkpoint inhibitors, drugs that remove inhibitory signals and restore the immune system’s ability to fight cancer, may be effective in shrinking melanoma tumors or preventing their growth in some patients who previously received standard therapy, according to new research results from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute. (ASCO Abstract 9520).

Johns Hopkins and Eisai Extend Drug Discovery Collaboration with New Licensing Agreement

The Johns Hopkins University and Eisai Inc., the U.S. pharmaceutical subsidiary of Tokyo, Japan-based Eisai Co., Ltd., announced today that they have extended their drug discovery collaboration through an exclusive licensing agreement.

Emergency Room Patients Routinely Overcharged, Study Finds

An analysis of billing records for more than 12,000 emergency medicine doctors across the United States shows that charges varied widely, but that on average, adult patients are charged 340 percent more than what Medicare pays for services ranging from suturing a wound to interpreting a head CT scan.

Reservoirs of Latent HIV Can Grow Despite Effective Therapy, Study Shows

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report new evidence that immune cells infected with a latent form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are able to proliferate, replenishing the reservoir of virus that is resistant to antiretroviral drug therapy.

Media Advisory: Experts Available to Discuss Historic Cancer Drug Approval

Today, for the first time, a drug has been FDA-approved for cancer based on disease genetics rather than type. Developed from 30 years of basic research at Johns Hopkins and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute, pembroluzimab now can be used for colon, pancreatic, stomach, ovarian and other cancers if genetic testing reveals defects in so-called mismatch repair genes.

Johns Hopkins Study Shows One of the Deadliest Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Preventable

In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.

Media Advisory: Alan Alda to Give Lecture on the Importance of Clear Science Communication at Johns Hopkins

You might remember him as Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H,” as Senator Vinick on “The West Wing,” or as the host of PBS’ “Scientific American Frontiers” for more than a decade. This Friday, Alan Alda will be visiting Johns Hopkins to share his thoughts on the importance of clear science communications to faculty, staff and students. Since 2009, he has been running the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stonybrook University, and has been a proponent of science communication and making science more accessible to everyone.

How the Injured Brain Tells the Body It’s Hurt

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.

New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss Proven Safe in Humans

In a small and preliminary clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it may be effective in preserving the vision of people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a leading cause of vision loss in the U.S., affecting an estimated 1.6 million Americans. The disease is marked by growth of abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid into the central portion of the retina called the macula, which we use for reading, driving and recognizing faces.