Current News Releases

Online Education Boosts Proper Use of Drugs That Prevent Blood Clots

Results of a yearlong study funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) with more than 900 nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital suggest that well-designed online education can decrease the rate of nonadministration of prescribed and necessary doses of blood thinners to prevent potentially lethal blood clots in hospitalized patients.

Scientists Develop Blood Test That Spots Tumor-Derived DNA in People With Early-Stage Cancers

In a bid to detect cancers early and in a noninvasive way, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report they have developed a test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA in blood and have used it to accurately identify more than half of 138 people with relatively early-stage colorectal, breast, lung and ovarian cancers. The test, the scientists say, is novel in that it can distinguish between DNA shed from tumors and other altered DNA that can be mistaken for cancer biomarkers.

Research Review Recommends Eliminating Widely Ordered Blood Test for Diagnosing Heart Attacks

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Mayo Clinic have compiled peer-reviewed evidence and crafted a guideline designed to help physicians and medical centers stop the use of a widely ordered blood test that adds no value in evaluating patients with suspected heart attack.

Brain Scan Study Adds to Evidence That Lower Brain Serotonin Levels are Linked to Dementia

In a study looking at brain scans of people with mild loss of thought and memory ability, Johns Hopkins researchers report evidence of lower levels of the serotonin transporter — a natural brain chemical that regulates mood, sleep and appetite.

Prostate Cancer Cells Become ‘Shapeshifters’ to Spread to Distant Organs

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report they have discovered a biochemical process that gives prostate cancer cells the almost unnatural ability to change their shape, squeeze into other organs and take root in other parts of the body. The scientists say their cell culture and mouse studies of the process, which involves a cancer-related protein called AIM1, suggest potential ways to intercept or reverse the ability of cancers to metastasize, or spread.

Extinction Mystery Solved? Fossil Evidence Suggests Humans Played a Role in Monkey’s Demise in Jamaica

Radiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species anywhere in the world to become extinct, and it may solve a long-standing mystery about the cause of its demise. The short answer: human settlement of its island home.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital Ranked Among the Top Three U.S. Adult Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

Out of nearly 4,700 hospitals reviewed, The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked #1 in Maryland and #3 in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s 2017–18 Best Hospitals list. Thirteen specialties at The Johns Hopkins Hospital are now among the top 10 in the nation. Ten specialties are in the top five.

Johns Hopkins Researcher Available to Discuss Your Brain on the Arts

Our brains interpret the world around us, taking in the sights, sounds, textures and smells of the world. But how does our brain respond when we observe art?

Study Adds to Evidence That Most Prescribed Opioid Pills Go Unused

In a review of half a dozen published studies in which patients self-reported use of opioids prescribed to them after surgery, researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a substantial majority of patients used only some or none of the pills, and more than 90 percent failed to dispose of the leftovers in recommended ways.

Guidelines for Assessing Orthostatic Hypotension Should Be Changed, New Study Recommends

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests that testing for the presence of orthostatic hypotension, a form of low blood pressure, be performed within one minute of standing after a person has been lying down. Current guidelines recommend taking the measurement three minutes after a person stands up.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Present Findings at AIDS Meeting in Paris

Richard Chaisson, M.D., primary investigator of these studies and director of the Center for Tuberculosis Research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will be available at IAS 2017 to comment on this research.

Johns Hopkins Experts Available to Discuss Protecting Endangered Species Using DNA Sequencing

Alan Scott, Ph.D., associate professor in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and codirector of the Genetic Resources Core Facility at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is available to comment on the recent DNA sequencing of the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, Neomonachus schauinslandi.

Research Shows One Aspect of the Affordable Care Act Has No Significant Impact on Emergency Department Patient Visits

As the debate surrounding the Affordable Care Act (ACA) looms in the U.S. Congress, Johns Hopkins researchers are weighing in on one aspect of the law. In 2014, as part of the ACA, Maryland was one of the states that expanded eligibility for its Medicaid program. One of the proposed benefits of expanding Medicaid under the ACA was a reduction in emergency department patient visits. However, some research prior to the ACA implementation found new Medicaid enrollees increased their visits to the emergency department.

Small Survey: Most Primary Care Physicians Can’t Identify All Risk Factors for Prediabetes

Johns Hopkins researchers who distributed a survey at a retreat and medical update for primary care physicians (PCPs) report that the vast majority of the 140 doctors who responded could not identify all 11 risk factors that experts say qualify patients for prediabetes screening. The survey, they say, is believed to be one of the first to formally test PCPs’ knowledge of current professional guidelines for such screening.

Quantifying Effectiveness of Treatment for Irregular Heartbeat

In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the standard of care treatment for atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat disorder.  This has the potential to let physicians and patients know immediately following treatment whether it was effective, or whether they’ll need to anticipate another procedure in the future. 

Immune System Found to Control Eye Tissue Renewal in Zebrafish

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report evidence that zebrafishes’ natural ability to regenerate their eyes’ retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes’ immune systems. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.

New Accelerator Seeks to Attract Connected Health and Fitness Startups from Across the Country to Baltimore

Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures, Plank Industries, the University of Maryland (through UM Ventures), Brown Advisory and the Abell Foundation announced today that they are providing support for M-1 Ventures, a new Baltimore-based startup accelerator focused on connected health and fitness technologies. The 16-week program will be housed in FastForward East, an innovation hub on the Johns Hopkins medical campus, and will challenge startups selected from a national applicant pool to validate their business models, engage with customers and build on traction they have already generated. Additional support for the program comes from the Maryland Department of Commerce and Village Capital.

Faster Diagnosis of Inherited and Lethal Nerve Disease Could Advance Search for New Treatments

Johns Hopkins physicians report success in a small study of a modified skin biopsy that hastens the earlier diagnosis of an inherited and progressively fatal nerve disease and seems to offer a clearer view of the disorder’s severity and progression. With a quicker and less invasive way to visualize the hallmark protein clumps of the rare but lethal disease — familial transthyretin amyloidosis — the researchers say they hope to more rapidly advance clinical trials of treatments that may slow the disease and extend patients’ lives.

Experimental “Enhancer” Drug May Boost Conventional Therapies for Deadly Pediatric Brain Cancers

Laboratory studies suggest that an experimental drug already in early clinical trials for a variety of adult cancers might enhance radiation and chemotherapy for two childhood brain cancers that currently are virtually always fatal.

On-Site Ecstasy Pill-Testing Services May Reduce User Risks at Concerts and Raves

Johns Hopkins scientists report that data collected over five years by volunteers who tested pills free of charge at music festivals and raves across the United States suggest that at least some recreational users of illegal drugs may choose not to take them if tests show the pills are adulterated or fake.