Current News Releases

Karen Horton Named Director of Department of Radiology and Radiological Science

Karen M. Horton, M.D., has been named director of the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. She had been interim director of the department and chairman of the board of Johns Hopkins Medical Imaging, LLC, since February 2016.

Pranita Tamma Receives Pediatric Scholarship Award

Pranita Tamma, M.D., M.H.S. has received the 2017 Pediatric Scholarship Award from the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) for her contributions to the study of antimicrobial resistance and for her antimicrobial stewardship, under the mentorship of Sara Cosgrove, M.D.

Mouse Studies Shed Light on How Protein Controls Heart Failure

A new study on two specially bred strains of mice has illuminated how abnormal addition of the chemical phosphate to a specific heart muscle protein may sabotage the way the protein behaves in a cell, and may damage the way the heart pumps blood around the body.

James Harris to Receive Catcher in the Rye Award from American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

James C. Harris, M.D., founding director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program at The Johns Hopkins University and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins University, will be presented with the Catcher in the Rye Advocacy Award to an Individual on Oct. 24 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP).

Seven Faculty Members Among New Electees to National Academy of Medicine

Seven faculty members of The Johns Hopkins University have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Announcement of the new members (80 in all) was made today in conjunction with the academy’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Experimental “Nano-Chemo” Particle to Treat Bladder Cancer

Working with mice and rats, Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a way to successfully deliver nano-sized, platinum-based chemotherapy drugs to treat a form of bladder cancer called nonmuscle-invasive that is found in the lining of the organ and has not invaded deeper into bladder tissue. The tiny drug-infused particles, they say, potentially offer a less toxic clinical alternative to standard chemotherapy delivered intravenously or through a catheter inserted into the bladder.

Mitochondrial DNA Could Predict Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death, Heart Disease

Johns Hopkins researchers report that the level, or “copy number,” of mitochondrial DNA—genetic information stored not in a cell’s nucleus but in the body’s energy-creating mitochondria—is a novel and distinct biomarker that is able to predict the risk of heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths a decade or more before they happen. In the future, testing blood for this genetic information could not only help physicians more accurately predict a risk for life-threatening cardiac events, but also inform decisions to begin—or avoid—treatment with statins and other drugs.

Hispanic Children in Immigrant Families Exposed to Fewer Adverse Experiences Than Those in U.S.-Native Families, New Study Finds

A new study of national survey information gathered on more than 12,000 Hispanic children from immigrant and U.S.-native families found that although they experience more poverty, those from immigrant families reported fewer exposures to such adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as parental divorce and scenes of violence.

Johns Hopkins Faculty to Speak at The Congress of Neurological Surgeons Meeting

Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) Meeting
Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Boston, Massachusetts
Oct. 7-11, 2017

Johns Hopkins Surgeons Perform First Real-Time Image Guided Spine Surgery

Surgeons at The Johns Hopkins Hospital have for the first time used a real-time, image-guided robot to insert screws into a patient’s spine. With last week’s surgery, Johns Hopkins joins the growing number of hospitals in the United States that offer robotic-assisted spine surgery.

Tip Sheet: Johns Hopkins Convenes Doctors from 70 Academic Centers to Improve Quality and Decrease Costs of Health Care

On October 8 and 9, 2017, Johns Hopkins will host the inaugural National Research & Education Conference of the High Value Practice Academic Alliance, a coalition created by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Faculty and trainees from more than 70 academic institutions representing multiple medical specialties and subspecialties will come together to share oral presentations and posters depicting quality improvement projects that have safely improved health care value.

Fruit Fly Muscles with a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Don’t Relax Properly

Using fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers have figured out why a particular inherited human heart condition that is almost always due to genetic mutations causes the heart to enlarge, thicken and fail. They found that one such mutation interferes with heart muscle’s ability to relax after contracting, and prevents the heart from fully filling with blood and pumping it out.

Firearm-Related Injuries Account for $2.8 Billion on Emergency Room and Inpatient Charges Each Year

A new Johns Hopkins study of more than 704,000 people who arrived alive at a United States emergency room for treatment of a firearm-related injury between 2006 and 2014 finds decreasing incidence of such injury in some age groups, increasing trends in others, and affirmation of the persistently high cost of gunshot wounds in dollars and human suffering.

Johns Hopkins Go Team Embarks on Medical Humanitarian Mission to Help Victims of Hurricanes Maria and Irma in Collaboration with Bloomberg Philanthropies

A team of medical experts from Johns Hopkins Go Team is on the island of St. John to provide and support patient care in the aftermath of hurricanes Maria and Irma. In collaboration with Bloomberg Philanthropies, this humanitarian mission brings much-needed supplies, medicines and medical personnel to the badly damaged clinic and triage center on the island. 

Paul Rothman Appointed to Second Term as Leader of Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels announced today the appointment of Dr. Paul B. Rothman to a second term as CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Media Alert: Jeeps for Joy to Donate More Than 100 Stuffed Animal Bears to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center

On September 30 Jeeps for Joy will form a Jeep procession and drive from Newark, Delaware to Johns Hopkins Children’s Center to donate more than 100 Build-a-Bear stuffed animals to Children’s Center staff to later distribute to patients. Jeeps for Joy is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and families in need within the Mid-Atlantic region.

Johns Hopkins Joins Collaborative Effort to Sequence the Redwood Genome

Researchers from Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the Save the Redwoods League have partnered in an ambitious plan to fully sequence the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes for the first time. Using a new genetic sequencing technology, called the Oxford Nanopore MinION device, researchers hope to sequence and annotate the genomes of these two species. The tree genomes will help to inform efforts to restore the health and resilience of these forests throughout their natural ranges as they face environmental stressors such as climate change.

Tip Sheet: Targeted Radiation for Childhood Cancer and Progress in Lowering Treatment Costs Among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

Below are brief descriptions of research results scheduled for presentation by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), Sept. 24–27, in San Diego.

Electronic Triage Tool Improves Patient Care in Emergency Departments

When a patient arrives in any emergency department, one of the first steps in their care process is triage, an opportunity for a care team member to identify critically ill patients and assign priority treatment levels.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Medicine to Host Pain Symposium to Address How the Health Care Industry Can Curb the Opioid Crisis

With the number of opioid-related overdose deaths reaching epidemic proportions in the United States, providers and staff at hospitals and health systems are joining together to combat the issue while preventing new cases of addiction.